Boston Pops Firework Special  
Boston Pops Firework Special
The 4th of July Independence Day celebrations in the USA are synonymous with huge firework shows. But the city of Boston stand out from other destinations because they are the originators of this proud tradition and in many ways the City of Champions remain the trend setters for spectacular rocket displays.
Way back in 1973 David Mulgar proposed a novel way of rejuvenating the Esplanade concert which was struggling to capture the people's imaginations. After a discussion with the head of the Boston Pops Orchestra Arthur Fielder, his brainwave was to combine music with a new spectacle. This included playing Tchaikovsky's “1812 Overture” and adding some very loud surprises.
The next year's festivities went off with a huge bang with the addition of howitzer cannons, rockets and the ringing of church bells. This signalled the birth of the modern day firework display as Fielder wanted to create a spectacle that sounded like the gates of hell had broken loose over the Charles River.
4 decades later the Boston Pops firework extravaganza is going stronger than ever and is widely regarded as the only place to see fireworks on the 4th of July. Hundreds of thousands of people make the journey from all over America and from further afield to stand on the banks of the river and celebrate the birth of the nation. But this number is dwarfed by the number of people who tune in on TV. Over seven million watch the 1-hour broadcast on CBS every year.
The Boston Pops has a rich and varied history having branched off from the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1885. Although most of their musicians are affiliated with the BSO, they approach their music with a more contemporary style with particular emphasis on light classical and popular music.