Cameron says the Oscars have a bias  

When you watch the Oscars, you don't just expect to see celebrities looking fabulous, but you also expect some narrative to remember the ceremony by. 2009's ceremony offered more than you could expect: James Cameron's visual effects masterpiece Avatar was head-to-head with the low-budget, war drama The Hurt Locker, directed by Kathryn Bigelow. The fact that Cameron happened to be Bigelow's ex-husband added to this dramatic narrative: both films and filmmakers antagonized one another in a battle for an Academy Award. Cameron may have won the divorce but Bigelow won the Oscar. But it didn't end there, Bigelow made history that night as the first and only woman ever to win the Best Director prize.

Although Cameron said he would be ok losing Best Director to Bigelow but that Avatar deserved the Best Picture prize. Despite his opinion, the film lost and Cameron had to settle for Best Cinematography, Best Visual Effects, and Best Art Direction Oscars apart from $2.7 billion worldwide.
Ever since, Cameron has been busy writing and developing four more Avatar sequels. Recently, he offered his thoughts on why Academy fails to recognize big blockbuster movies:
“There have been a few times throughout the history of the Oscars where a wildly popular film was well-receive, but your typical year the Academy takes the position of: ‘It is our patrician duty to tell the great unwashed what they should be watching,‘ and they don't reward the films that people really want to see - that they're paying money to go see - and they're telling them, ‘Yeah, you think you like that, but what you should be liking is this.‘ As long as the Academy sees that as their duty, don't expect high ratings. Expect a good show, and do that duty, but don't whine about your ratings. Titanic was a very unusual case, I'm not saying it's a better film than films before or after, or it was necessarily a better year in general, but it was a film that made a boatload of money and got a lot of nominations. The next time we see that, we'll see rating go up. It's that simple.”
Oscar producers and ABC have been trying to drive more viewers to the show. It began when The Dark Knight missed out on a Best Picture nomination thanks to Harvey Weinstein strong-arming The Reader in the last minute. In 2009, when Avatar was nominated, the Academy expanded its Best Picture category to up to 10 nominees, with the goal of mixing arthouse with blockbuster fare. It worked the first year, but since then the category has only included a couple of commercial hits here and there.
Cameron takes it further and accuses the Academy of having a bias against technologically inclined films:
“There's definitely a bias. The Academy still has a majority of its members that are actors. Look, I love actors, but that's how they think - they're generally skeptical of technology. So when they see a film that's too dependent on visual effects, they say, oh, that's not an acting movie. Well Titanic was a visual effects movie in sheep's clothing, you know? Yes, it had visual effects, but it was about the people and about the story. The visual effects were eclipsed by that. But if you do a movie like Avatar, the effects are right out front, and even though I felt the acting was just as good, and the story we were telling was just as good, they're not going to reward it the same way. That's just a fact of life. I had made a decision way before Titanic that I wasn't going to serve two masters: I was going to put my visual cinema first. even though I've spent an awful lot of time on scripts and on performance, I still love doing big, visual cinema. I doubt I'll even get nominated again, but if I did, I'm probably going to lose to a Woody Allen movie. That's the nature of it. So you don't try to serve two masters.”

 

Hollywood’s favorite movie lines  

“I'm going to make him an offer he can't refuse.”

“Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn.”
“Why so serious?”
“May the force be with you.”
“Here's looking at you, kind.”
“Love means never having to say you're sorry.” - Love Story, 1970
“They may take our lives, but they'll never take our freedom!” - Braveheart, 1995
“They call me Mister Tibbs!” - In the Heat of the Night, 1967
“Magic Mirror on the wall, who is the fairest one of all?” - This is the famous quote from Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, 1937.
“Badges? We ain't got no badges! We don't need no badges! I don't have to show you any stinking badges!” - The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 1948. This is an actual misquote of the line “We don't need no stinking badges!”
“Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in.” - The Godfather. Part III, 1990.
“Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the war room!” - Dr. Strangelove or How I learned to stop worrying and Love the bomb, 1964. When Stanley Kubrick sat down to adapt Peter George's novel Red Alert to the screen, the director struggled with treating the material as a straight drama, as he initially intended. “My idea of doing
“I wish I knew how to quit you.” - Brokeback Mountain, 2005. Screenwriter Diana Ossana extracted this line from the New Yorker short story that inspired the film, co-written by Larry McMurtry. “The film has become a part of the popular culture,” says Ossana. “We have a Google Alert for the film, and in the 10 years since it came out there hasn't been a day that there wasn't something, somewhere in the news about Brokeback Mountain.”
“Good morning, Vietnam!” - Good morning, Vietnam, 1987. The real-life Adrian Cronauer confessed he came up with the line because he needed to make time while he was shuffling papers to start the show.
“Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. You're my only hope.” - Star Wars, 1977. This line transcended to real life. Soon after the film came out, Sir Alec Guinness told the BBC he had been receiving very strange letters from fans seeking wisdom. “I've been getting some pretty strange letters: ‘My wife and I have got problems, could you come over and live with us.”
“After all, tomorrow is another day!” - Gone with the wind, 1939. Although the screenplay had several revisions, this line is lifted straight form the book. Image By Employee(s) of MGM [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
“I'm not bad. I'm just drawn that way.” - Who Framed Roger Rabbit, 1988
“I'm the king of the world!” - Titanic, 1997. Director James Cameron admitted he was making a fool of himself by repeating the line as he accepted the movie's best picture Oscar.
“Fasten your seat belts. It's going to be a bumpy night.” - All About Eve, 1950. Despite the film holding the record for the most Academy Award nominations for a single film (14, tied with Titanic and La La Land), this is one of the most misquoted lines in film history. Most say: “It's going to be a bumpy ride”

 

How Fuller House ended up in Netflix  

Even though Full House was a huge hit during its original run, when the series creator Jeff Franklin pitched the idea of a spinoff to traditional outlets, they all shut their doors. All but one. Netflix was the only major network that took up the challenge of bring Fuller House back to the small screen.

“We had actually originally pitched the show to more traditional outlets,” said the series creator Jeff Franklin. “We went to ABC, we went to Nick at Nite, to the home of Full House both originally and now and figured that was probably a great fit for the show because it had such success for both ABC and Nick at Nite. We also went to TBS where it was airing and we went to some other places. We actually hadn't thought about the streaming services. All of those places passed on the show and then one of the executives from Nickelodeon - his name is Brian Wright - moved over to Netflix and they actually called us and said, ‘We'd like to hear the pitch.' It was really Netflix that took the lead, not me.”
After Jeff Franklin's exhausting process of pitching to so many different places, luckily Brian Wright helped him out and then Netflix took over and made him a deal he couldn't refuse:
“Well you know the simpler answer is they bought the show. That's really the simple answer. They stepped up and wanted the show and offered us a really nice deal to start off with,” Jeff Franklin said.
The show produced 13 episodes during its first season. A short time after that first season was available for streaming, Netflix made the decision to renew the series for season 2.
External companies that aim at tracking the show's ratings have listed Fuller House as one of Netflix's largest successes and potentially even its most popular show at the time of its release earlier this year. Several households streamed the series right after season 2 hit the airwaves on December 9, 2016.
The streaming network giant has recently renewed the series for a third season which will be much longer than the past two have been. The third installment will consist of 18 episodes, an initiative that will surely make fans happy.
The news came at a time when everybody was eagerly expecting for it:
“I hope all your readers tune in sooner rather than later, because we are really anxious to get going again,” said the series creator.
What you can expect on season 3 are more catchphrases the likes of uncle Joey's “Cut. It. Out.”, DJ's “Oh my lanta!”, Stephanie's “How rude!”, uncle Jesse's “Have mercy!” and so on.
Fans also hope they will get to see the Olsen Twins on this new season. It's a long shot as the twins skipped the first two seasons, but with the spinoff's success, perhaps Michelle will show up in Season 3.
And will happen with Stephanie? As a singer, is she going to be make it as big as Jesse and the Rippers did?
 
Netflix is the world's leading internet television network with over 100 million members in over 190 countries enjoying more than 125 million hours of TV shows and movies per day, including original series, documentaries and feature films. Members can watch as much as they want, anytime, anywhere, on nearly any Internet-connected screen. Members can play, pause and resume watching.

 

Best Speeches from the SAG Awards  

At the 2017 SAG Awards, several winners gave powerful messages. Here are excerpts from speeches by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who won an award for “Veep.” Mahershala Ali, who took home an award for “Moonlight,” and David Harbour, the star of Stranger Things, who won the SAG equivalent of best TV drama.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Veep”
Whether the Russians did or did not hack the voting of tonight's SAG Awards, I look out on the million, or probably even a million and a half people in this room, and I say, this award is legitimate, and I won! I'm the winner, the winner is me — landslide!
... To a less insane note, I'd like to say that I am a very proud member of this union, and I'm thrilled to be here tonight, and I thank the Screen Actors Guild. I want you all to know that I am the daughter of an immigrant. My father fled religious persecution in Nazi-occupied France, and I'm an American patriot. And I love this country. And because I love this country, I am horrified by its blemishes. This immigrant ban is a blemish, and it is un-American.
... Our sister guild, the [Writers Guild], made a statement today that I would like to read because I am in complete agreeance with it. Our guilds are unions of storytellers who have always welcomed those from the nations and of varying beliefs who wish to share their creativity with America. We are grateful for them. We stand with them, and we will fight for them. Thank you very much.
Mahershala Ali, “Moonlight”
What I've learned from working on “Moonlight” is, we see what happens when you persecute people. They fold into themselves. And what I was so grateful about in having the opportunity to play Juan was, playing a gentleman who saw a young man folding into himself as a result of the persecution of his community, and taking that opportunity to uplift him and tell him that he mattered and that he was O.K. and accept him and, uh — I hope that we do a better job of that.
You know, when we kind of get caught up in the minutiae, the details that make us all different, I think there's two ways of seeing that. There's an opportunity to see the texture of that person, the characteristics that make them unique.
And then there's an opportunity to go to war about it, and to say that that person is different than me, and I don't like you, so let's battle. My mother is an ordained minister. I'm a Muslim. She didn't do back flips when I called her to tell her I converted 17 years ago. But I tell you now, we put things to the side, and I'm able to see her, she's able to see me — we love each other, the love has grown, and that stuff in minutiae. It's not that important.
Actors seek posthumous protections  

 

The death of Star Wars' princess Carrie Fisher set off waves of speculation over her character's return in the saga's future episodes. Advances in digital technology are allowing filmmakers to resurrect characters after a performer dies. But this is not good news for everybody. This trend has sent Hollywood actors in the here-and-now scrambling to exert control over how their characters and images are portrayed in the hereafter.

“Celebrities are increasingly involved in making plans to protect their intellectual property rights ,” said Mark Roesler, an attorney and chairman of CMG Worldwide, an agency representing celebrity estates. “They understand that their legacy will continue beyond their lifetime.”
Roesler said that at least 25 of his clients are negotiating the use of their or their loved ones‘ computer-generated images in movies, television and commercials. While employment contracts determine how they can be used in a particular film or commercial, a performer's will may address broader issues.
According to Roesler, some actors or their family fret that overexposure will tarnish a celebrity's image. These wills vary.
Heirs already have control over actors‘ posthumous profits by requiring their permission for any use of their likeness, California law states. However, as technology has improved, what actors are focused on nowadays is on steering their legacy with stipulations on how their images are used - or by forbidding their use.
Robin Williams, for instance, who died back in 2014, forbid any use of his image for commercial purposes until 2039, according to court documents. He also blocked anyone from digitally inserting him into a movie or TV scene or using a hologram, as was done with rapper Tupac Shakur at Southern California's Coachella music festival in 2012 - 16 years after his murder.
With digital technology opening up so many possibilities, actors‘ union SAG-AFTRA is lobbying for all states to enact protections on the use of celebrity images after they die.
“The issue for us is straightforward and clear: The use of performers‘ work in this manner has obvious economic value and should be treated accordingly,” a SAG-AFTRA spokesperson said.
Another issue with this technology is that the prospect is more costly than hiring even a first-tier actor. “It's very expensive,” Litwak said.
Another question for filmmakers is whether technology provides a realistic portrayal.
“Most people in the movie industry don't think it‘s quite there yet,” Litwak said. “It's amazing what they can do, but it's not as good as a real actor. It seems a bit artificial.”
After Tarkin's resurrection in “Rogue One” some fans complained the portrayal did not look human enough.
“Does Disney want to have people scrutinizing how real that synthetic character is, rather than talking about the movie itself?” he asked about the prospect of Leia's return. “It would be a distraction.” 
Oscars 2017   

Presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), the 89th Academy Awards ceremony celebrates the best films of 2016.  Late-night talk show host, producer and comedian Jimmy Kimmel will host the Oscars for the first time. The 89th Academy Awards will be held on Sunday, February 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, and will be broadcast live on the ABC Television Network at 7 p.m. EST/4 p.m. PST. The Oscars presentation will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.
Televised in the United States by ABC, the ceremony will be produced by Michael De Luca and Jennifer Todd while television host Jimmy Kimmel will be the presenter for the first time.
The nominees were announced by directors Guillermo del Toro, Jason Reigman, Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs, actresses Brie Larson, Marcia Gay Harden, Glenn Close, Gabourey Sidibe and Jennifer Hudson, and actors Terrence Howard, Ken Watanabe, Demian Bichir and writer Dustin Lance Black.
This is the first time ever that the nominees are revealed via global live stream at the Academy's official websites (oscars.org and oscars.com), and through local broadcasters, including Good Morning America. La La Land received a total fourteen nominations, a record set by All About Eve in 1950s and only tied by Titanic in 1997. The motion pictures Arrival and Moonlight came in second with eight nominations each.
Before the ceremony, we go over the records set by movies in past ceremonies.
The films which have won most awards are Ben-Hur (1959), Titanic (1997), The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), which won 11 awards each.
Most nominations received by a single film are All About Eve (1950), Titanic (1997) and La La Land (2016). Each film has received 14 nominations.
The largest sweep (winning awards in every nominated category) was The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). The film won all 11 categories for which it was nominated: Best Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Original Score, Original Song, Sound Mixing, Art Direction, Makeup, Costume Design, Film Editing and Visual Effects.
Walt Disney won 26 awards, which make him the individual who has won most awards.
Meanwhile, Edith Head is the female who has won most awards. She won eight Oscars, all for Costume Design. She won the Oscars for Best Costume Design, starting with The Heiress (1949), and ending with The Sting (1973). After 43 years she left Paramount for Universal, perhaps due to her successful partnership with Alfred Hitchcock. She also adapted her skills for television.
With four awards, all for Best Actress, Katherine Hepburn has won more acting Oscars than anybody else.
As to directing, John Ford tops the list with four awards.
While Italy has won most awards for Best Foreign Language Film (14 awards), France is the country that has received most nominations for this category with a total of 40 nominations. Italy has received in total 32 nominations.
Meanwhile, the foreign language films that have won most awards are Fanny And Alexander (1982) and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), while the latter is the foreign-language film that has received most nominations with a total of ten nominations.
To end this post with a happy note: with 20 nominations, Meryl Streep is the actress with most total nominations for acting.
 
Additional note: This article was written before the awards, now we know, Moonlight was eventually named the best picture winner after it was mistakenly announced that La La Land had won the award. Warren Beatty, who was presenting the award with Dunaway, had been handed the incorrect envelope by representatives of PricewaterhouseCoopers.
The future of Star Wars  

From David Bowie to Prince, George Michael and Debbie Reynolds, the year of 2016 took the lives of all-time beloved celebrities. But no death has left more questions unanswered than the loss Star Wars' icon Carrie Fisher.
In particular, what's “Star Wars” without Princess Leia? It is up to Disney to decide.
While fans worldwide, the cast and crew of the classic films mourn the death of Carrie Fisher, questions have arisen about how the actress' passing will affect the sci-fi franchise going forward.
According to Deadline, back in July 2016 Fisher finished filming the yet-to-be-named “Star Wars: Episode VIII”, in which her role of Leia has a larger appearance than that of her cameo role in “The Force Awakens.”
However, Disney and LucasFilm are yet to comment on how Fisher's death will affect the completion of “Episode VIII” or impact the script and filming of “Episode IX.”
“The fact that we are talking about this shows how woven into the DNA of ‘Star Wars' Carrie Fisher is,” Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for comScore, told CNBC. “This is no small thing.”
As there is a shortage of information about General Leia's story arc in the forthcoming films, fans and analysts can only guess how Disney will manage without the iconic actress and character.
After the demise of Paul Walker, a main player in the “Fast and Furious” films, writer Chris Morgan had to undertake the task of rewriting the script of “Furious 7” so that Walker's character could exit the series via footage that had already been shot during production.
The script was rearranged to account for Walker's absence and the production team was tasked to use a combination a CGI and Walker's younger brother as stand-ins to get the shots they needed to complete the film. By the way, The Fate of the Furious - #F8 In Theaters April 14 2017 by Universal Pictures is looking pretty awesome.
Therefore, fans and analysts speculate that a similar fate could await future “Star Wars” films. Even though Fisher had finished her scenes for “Episode VIII, Disney could opt to alter the script in order to explain Leia's absence in future films. Episode VIII is scheduled to hit the theaters in December, 2017.
Following the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman in 2014, Lionsgate decided to diminish the actor's role in the final installment of the “Hunger Games” franchise instead of digitally recreating the actor for the scenes he hadn't filmed yet.
The writers proceeded to use the footage they had of the actor to complete several scenes and gave some of his character's dialogue and actions to other characters.
It is yet to be known how essential the character of Leia is for “Episode IX” and if more script alternations will be necessary before its release in 2019.
As a standalone Han Solo Film is scheduled to be released by Disney in 2018, the production team will have more time to make major alterations to the final film in the new trilogy, if that is the direction they decide to head in.
Another direction would be to recreate Carrie Fisher digitally like they did in Rogue One. Instead of recasting the role of Grand Moff Tarkin, a character portrayed by the late Peter Cushing in the original trilogy, Director Gareth Edwards and the team at Industrial Light and Magic opted to recreate him digitally.
British actor Guy Henry was chosen to perform the role of Tarkin during the production and then digitally altered in post-production in order to look like Cushing.
This technique has caused some controversy around the legal and ethical issues arising around the portrayal of a demised actor's likeness on film; however, the technique sets a precedent that could mean Fisher's Leia can still appear in “Episode IX” without altering the script.
In this case, Disney might need permission from Fisher's estate to go ahead with the digital replication, unless it is enough for the production company to hold copyright to her performance in “The Force Awakens” to recreate her digitally.
“It's a somewhat novel area of law where, as a matter of best practice, they might seek out rights from the estate,” Paul O'Brien, an associate attorney with Falcon, Jacobson & Gertler LLP, a New York law firm, told CNBC. “But if they had an agreement previously in place that allows them to create derivative works based on Carrie's prior performances they could be covered by that.”
However, Disney is not entirely satisfied with the feedback fans gave to that technique in ‘Rogue One.'
“Based on the divisive way that fans have reacted to the effects in ‘Rogue One' and considering that her death will still be pretty fresh, I think they won't go the CGI route,” Erik Davis, managing editor of Fandango said. “Unless, it's to touch up a tiny bit, a fraction of a scene. Sort of the way ‘Fast and Furious' did with Paul Walker. I think that that would be the only case that they would use effects.”

 

The Nightmare Before Christmas 22nd Anniversary  
Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas' 22th anniversary in 2015. Based on 1993 American stop motion musical fantasy directed by Henry Selick, we've compiled unforgettable quotes from the famous film to celebrate over two decades since its release.
“I'm a master of fright, and a demon of light, and I'll scare you right out of your pants. To a guy in Kentucky I'm mister lucky. And I'm known throughout England and France. And since I'm dead, I can take off my head to recite Shakespeare quotations. No animal or man can scream like I can, with the fury of my recitations”. - Jack Skellington
“There's children throwing snowballs instead of throwing heads. They're busy building toys and absolutely no one is dead!”. - Jack Skellington
“Well, what the heck, I really did my best. And by God, I really tasted something swell, that's right. And for a moment, why, I even touched the sky. And at least I left some stories they can tell, I did. And for the first time since I don't remember when I felt like my old bony self again. And I, Jack, the Pumpkin King... That's right. I am the Pumpkin King! And I just can't wait until next Halloween ‘cause I've got some new ideas that will really make them scream. And by God, I'm really gonna give it all my might! Uh-oh, I hope there's still time to set things right. Sandy Claws...” - Jack Skellington
“I am the shadown on the moon at night filling your dreams to the brim with fright”. - Oogie Boogie Man
“Oh, the sound of rolling dice to me is music in the air, ‘cause I'm a gambling Boogie Man, although I don't play fair. It's much more fun, I must confess, with lives on the line. Not mine, of course, but yours, old boy, now that'll be just fine.” - Oogie Boogie Man
“Are you a gambling man, Santa?” - Oogie Boogie Man
“Jack! But they said you were dead. You must be double dead!” - Oogie Boogie Man
“Say it once, say it twice, take a chance and roll the dice. Ride with the moon in the dead of night”. - The witches
Nov: Thanksgiving Day Parade  
Every fourth Thursday in November giant helium-filled balloons shaped like popular cartoon heroes float above the streets of New York City in the Thanksgiving Day Parade. The popular event is organised by Macy's, a mid-range to upscale chain of department stores, every year. Thursday, November 24 is this years Thanksgiving Day 2016
Masses of people flood to the streets of Manhattan to watch the balloons shaped like Shrek, Buzz Lightyear, Snoopy and pals. The parade also features live music and other performances by celebrities such as Miley Cyrus and Kermit the Frog aboard travelling floats.
College and high school marching bands from across the country also take part in the parade. Cheerleaders and dancers chosen by the National Cheerleaders Association from various high school across the country march down the streets. Likewise, the Radio City Rockettes are a classic performance. As a symbol of the imminent Christmas and holiday season, the figure of Santa Claus concludes the parade.
The parade starts at 9am, but people start arriving three hours before to get a good viewing spot, namely the area between 61st and 72nd streets on Central Park West. The even lasts three hours.
The parade starts in 77th street and Central Park then continues west to Columbus Circle in 59th street. Next, they march in Broadway to 34th street and Macy's Herald Square ending on 7th avenue. The streets that are part of the parade route are closed to traffic during the event.
The tradition dates back to 1924 and ties as second oldest Thanksgiving parade in the United States along with America's Thanksgiving Parade in Detroit. Both parades are four years younger than the 6abc Dunkin' Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in Philadelphia.
Top Events in the USA  
Yeahhh it's a party in the USA, like Miley Cyrus' song, here you can find the top events happening in the USA, so you can put them on your calendar and avoid missing any.
1) Rose Bowl Parade: is the biggest college football playoff held on New Year's Day in Pasadena, California. The event is of such magnitude that is attracts hundreds of thousands of spectators and is televised across the USA. The football match is preceded by a magnificent parade where you can see spectacular floats constructed exclusively out of flowers and flower petals.
2) Super Bowl Sunday: apparently American football always makes for a great event in the USA and the Super Bowl is so popular that its fame transcends national frontiers. This is the grand championship playoff match of the National Football League, which is held in one of the southern USA sun-belt cities or in a large indoor football arena. The event includes spectacular entertainment featuring internationally-famous artists. Tickets are very hard to get and usually cost over $1000 per seat.
3) Sundance Film Festival: This is the American version of the Cannes Film Festival. Held in Park City - Utah-, Sundance Film Festival features some of the finest new and experimental works by young filmmakers.
4) Mardi Gras in New Orleans: the last weeks prior to the solemn religious season of Lent is marked by a energetic party in New Orleans, Louisiana. The celebration features grand parades, entertainment and nightly parties escalating through the last weekend and culminating with a final blast on “Fat Tuesday”.
5) Spring Break in Florida: hordes of college students from across the country flock to Florida for wild days of beach and parties.
6) Calle Ocho Festival Miami: also in Florida, Calle Ocho Festival is an ethnic street fair held at the heart of “Little Havana” on Eighth Street. It features a huge variety of festivities including latin entertainment, a diversity of ethnic foods and open-air street markets.
  
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